Tuesday, December 27, 2011

In the novel Lord of the Flies by William Golding, structure is used to show a clear pattern of change, through both the events in the story and the characters. This effectively conveys the theme of man’s inherent evil and builds tension in the plot to ho

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In the novel Lord of the Flies by William Golding, structure is used to show a clear pattern of change, through both the events in the story and the characters. This effectively conveys the theme of man’s inherent evil and builds tension in the plot to hold the readers attention.


There is a clear pattern of change throughout the novel, which shows the transition from civilised to savage in an environment without society’s boundaries. This is obvious in the leadership of the boys. At the beginning of the novel, Ralph is elected as chief of the groups, and establishes a democracy where everyone is free to have their own say. But by the end of the novel, Jack controls his tribe in a primitive and dictatorial manner. “You see! They do what I say!” The small bouts of bullying towards Piggy “Shut up Fatty” have developed to a point where the boys kill Simon and murder Piggy.


This change is also shown through the characters. Jack begins the novel as an arrogant but moral English boy. “We’ve got to have rules and obey them”. However, as he becomes a skilled and obsessive hunter, he is revealed as a bully, tyrant and agressor who asserts his authority through fear and blood-lust. Roger is another character who undergoes this change. At the start of the story, he throws stones at the littluns but aims to miss “There was an area around Henry where he dare not throw. Here, invisible yet strong, lay the taboo of the old life”. But the straints of civilisation slowly slip away as the boys lapse into barbarism and near the end of the novel, Roger levers a boulder off a cliff at Castle rock, killing piggy.


The structure Golding uses helps to build tension in the plot, and keeps the reader guessing and interested. We do not reach the climax of the story till the last chapter, when the boys are hunting Ralph “a stick sharpened at both ends”. By now, they have destroyed most of the Island with fire, and we are captured in anxiety, shocked by how far the boys “evilness” will go. The arrival of the navel officer on the beach shocks us back to reality, and the boys are but we are still left wondering how far the boys would have gone if left un-interrupted.


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A clear pattern of change shown through the events and characters in Lord of the Flies is used to convey the theme of mans evil nature, as it allows the clear transition from good to evil. It also builds tension in the story, as we wonder what will happen to these seemingly innocent Englishboys as they slip away from civilisation.





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