Saturday, February 23, 2013

How does the author portray a turning point in Shawshank Redemption and why is it important:

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In the film Shawshank redemption, director Frank Durabont presents the turning point by using a scene which gives visual indication to the audience that the climax it about to happen soon. He does this through a series of camera shots, scenery and emphasis on the themes of the film as a whole.

This particular scene opens up with a low angle shot of two massive walls that suggest imprisonment and enclosure. The shot has taken special care to show the walls to be dark, dreary and dim that put forward the idea that Andy is taking a psychological step in his head to finally gain his freedom that he has been thinking about all these years.

Other ways Durabont portrays this scene is through Mise-en-scene where everything happens in front of the camera. Props, which are located, are the speakers. The speaker poles give Andy hope to be free as music is the one thing in prison that can be truly yours “that’s the beauty of music. They can’t take that from you”. Music is the one this, which makes you a person, and feels like a free man. Throughout prison Andy depends deeply on music through playing opera on the speakers to give Red a harmonica to show him that hope really can help u survive in prison. Another prop placed in this scene is the weights. Although we know Andy is not a strong person physically we know that mentally he has the strength and the willpower to make it through prison and escape.

Further examples of Durabont portraying this scene is through scenery and Andy’s body language. We now understand that prison is a dark and deceitful place, by emphasis of the prison walls. But in this particular scene Durabont adds a bit of blue sky, which put forwards the idea of freedom and outer life beyond those walls. Andy is placed against the wall in a foetal position which proposes he is weak and been defeated by the warden and prison itself. As we see the contrasting dark prison to light blue skies we see that Andy is taking a step in his head to actually decide what has to be done in prison. With his conversation with Red, he makes it clear that something is about to happen “get busy living or get busy dying”, we know from the way Durabont presented the scene that something has triggered in Andys head and hates the warden enough to betray him and gain his freedom that was his all along.

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Most importantly Frank Durabont filmed this scene to reflect all the main themes in the film. It is important as it makes the audience understand the relationships and themes better through one whole scene. The most important theme used here was freedom. Not only could we see the blue skies suggesting life beyond but also Andy talking about the Pacific Ocean and “how it has no memory”. This dialogue with Red only makes Andy want freedom more as we see him step into the light out of the shadows and prepare himself for what has to come.

Institutionalized is another theme that is deeply brought into the scene. Red is convinced that he would never make it on the outside world, as he would be unimportant with no education whereas in prison he is an important man who can get things. Andy on the other hand uses his friendship with Red to guide him out of those thoughts and coax him leaving and joining him on the other side. Andy uses his hope on Red to show him that “hope is a good thing, maybe the best thing and no good thing ever dies”.

Durabont takes special care with this particular scene as all the themes intertwine with each other and adapt to the visual parts of the scene. This turning point scene is important as it shows Andy moving on from trying to survive in prison to trying to escape from it.





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Saturday, February 16, 2013

Gangs and Their Affects on Society

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Gangs are a violent reality that people have to deal with in cities of every size. Gangs are not a new phenomenon in America. Mainly youths, have banded together for reasons ranging from protection to those who just want to occupy time, fill emptiness in their lives, or experience some sense of belonging. Whatever the reason, whena gang emerges communities almost always suffer the consequences. With the widespread popularity of gangs in the recent years, it seems as though no city has been left untouched by their violence and corruption.

There are many social factors that may contribute to why kids may find it so glamorous to join a gang. One of these social influences comes from television and movies. Children are fascinated by the blood and gore that they see through the media. When adults see violence on television, we look past all the blood and concentrate on the pain that the victim must feel. Children do not have that same connection. emotionally they become immune to the violence and it becomes acceptable. Once the idea that violence is an acceptable behavior has been instilled in the minds of these young children, they become increasingly prone to being easily pushed into a gang situation. Society has allowed the media to portray violence as a norm which in turn produces children who feel that their actions are justifiable because they saw it in a movie. TV, movies, music and video games all contribute to the desensitizing of human life and human worth.

Another social factor of why kids choose to join gangs is because they are lacking prental guidance and love. We live in a society where both parents have to work outside of the home. We leave these children at h ome unsupervised and neglected. Often times, it is the children who feel neglected that turn to gangs to find some sense of belonging. Itr is these children who feel deprived of attention and love that allow gangs to take the place of their famiy. It almost seems as though parents feel that putting food on the table is enough to raise a child. One scary statistic that I read reports that gang affiliation begins aroun seventh or eigth grade. Peer pressure at this age is so strong and gangs offer these children the support that they need to deal with it. An insecure kid that joins a gang suddenly finds himself to be the center of attention. lack of parental involvement ina childs life creates a boid that children would do anything to fill, even if it meant turning deliquency to gain the attention.

The third social factor that I want to address is peer pressure. Peer pressure is not discriminatory. It happens to everyone, in every city and school. Our culture emphasizes the standrds set by others. The pressure to conform to our surrounding is evident with every decision we make. To some, being in a gang means you have a higher social status. You are respected by everyone, as well as feared by everyone. There are certain areas of our world where joining a gang may be the only way to surivie. People in low rent areas are most often being repressed due to poverty and sometimes even race. Peer pressure is what pushes many people to make choices, even when they know that their decision may not be in their best interest.

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I believe that each of us needs to responsibility for our own children and make them a priority. We need to keep informed of our childrens activities, and more importantly keep open communication with them. I feel that if our kids know we love them unconditionally, it may raise their self-esteem enough to say, Its okay if I dont conform. Maybe then our children will be able to reject the propaganda of gang memers and make choices based on values and what is right.



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Thursday, February 14, 2013

hamlet..was he mad?

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About the play

Hamlet is one of the most tragedy play ever William Shakespeare wrote in the 16th century. It was wrote and came out to light in 160.another version of the play in 105 was printed and published by William Shakespeare and it was longer version than the last version was. After William Shakespeare was died in 1616, two of his colleagues named heminge and condell collected the last two versions of the play Hamlet and mixed it together to make the best version ever of the play hamlet in 16 which is well printed in all present books now.

hamlet was the fourth tragedy William Shakespeare wrote after Titus andronicus, Romeo and Juliet and Julius Caesar.

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About the writer

William Shakespeare 1564-1616

William Shakespeare was born in 1564, his dad was the merchant of the small town in Stratford called Avon, he went to a grammar school in that town. After he finished school he worked with his dad and he didn’t continue higher education, he married when he was young, he became a father of three daughters. In 15 he was well known in London and he became Actor and shareholder in Lord Chamberlain’s Company (Later the King’s Men) by 155. After 15, a shareholder at the Globe Theatre, Actor, playwright, and sometimes director.

. All of his writing subjects that consists of seventeen comedies, ten historic plays, three poems and ten tragedies was taken from the history of England.such as Henry IV, V, VI, VIII, Richard II, Richard III

Between 150 and 161, he wrote 8 plays.

He became a sad writer and his sadness affected his life and writing by his daughter’s death in 156. Such asTragedies Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth generally considered to be his greatest works.

Shakespeare continued to write serious drama based on the roman history (Julius Caesar) and to write tragedies based on the Egyptian roman history (antony and Cleopatra).Shakespeare was back to write comedies with seventeen plays such as Comedies Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Comedy of Errors. generally considered to be his greatest works

before he retire from the theatre.





He returned from London to his hometown Avon in Stratford before he was died in 1616.

In this play im writing about ‘hamlet’ I found out some notes about Shakespeare in general way of writing this play which seems to me its general characteristics in all plays he did wrote

Early point of attack.

Several lines of action (subplots), independent at first, then somehow merge together.

Large number and variety of incidents; mixing of tears and laughter; gentle and violent passions.

Time and space used freely � a sense of ongoing life behind the scenes.

Large range and number of characters; 0 is common; rich and poor, all individuals.

Varied language elegant, ribald, witty, prosaic; all to enhance character and action

Subjects from many sources (mythology, history, legend, fiction, plays) but reworked to become his own.



William Shakespeare left the whole world but he left behind the best writing the human mentality could ever produce to the humanity.











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Thursday, February 7, 2013

Industrialism and the Victorian novel

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The industrial revolution created an entirely new dynamic in British society. Whilst a population explosion quadrupled the number of people, millions also migrated to the large cities in search of work in factories, creating a new urban underclass that had never existed previously. While London had a population of 00 thousand in 1801, a century later it had increased nearly seven fold, the majority of these being working class country people who had come to the cities in hope of work, or the children of these. They often lived in abject poverty, working long hours for little money and much of their living and working conditions are reflected in the literature of the time.

Some idea of what life might have been like for the urban working class in the Victorian era is given in Elizabeth Gaskell’s novel Mary Barton (1848). The eponymous heroine is a young working class woman living in urban Manchester, and much of what goes on around her is clearly described to give the reader an idea of what her life is like. Many descriptions are designed to evoke sympathy for the plight of the working classes. In particularly the numerous deaths, especially infant deaths, which occur almost as a sideline to the thrust of the narrative, although none the less would have been a distinct part of the lives of working class Manchester people in the “Hungry Forties”, are obviously designed to play on the reader’s sympathies. By establishing the characters of family members and the personal effect such deaths have on them, it helps the reader identify with their losses, encouraging them to imagine themselves in the same situation. For example, John Barton’s disgust for the upper-classes could at first seeming almost irrational, yet once the circumstances of his sons death through want of the basic necessities is explained the bitterness he feels towards those who had enough money to save his child but did not care is understandable. This device can be seen at its height in the final chapters where Mary is left orphaned, and Jem with only his widowed mother, thus leaving only three of the two principle families alive and inviting the reader to consider how they would cope with such a profusion of needless death.

Yet not only does the novel help to convey a realistic idea of what life might have been like by creating empathy between reader and characters, it also highlights the disparity of the situation between rich and poor by juxtaposing luxury and starvation. Specifically the chapter entitled ‘Poverty and Death’ where John Barton and his friend Wilson visit a family where the breadwinner has fallen ill and then dies for lack of medical attention is the most bleak and hopeless scenes in the novel. Yet it is made more effective by the distinct contrast with the luxury displayed in the Carson household when John goes to get a medical form. The “luxurious library” with its “well spread breakfast-table” seem almost criminal decadence, while one of the Davenport’s two rooms is said to be unfit for any “human being, much less a pig, [to] have lived there many days”. Comparisons can be drawn between the bedridden mother of the Carson family who is in a bad mood and has a headache, and the mother of the Davenport family who must lie on the floor despite her starvation and sickness, because her husband has greater need for the bed. This scene shows both sides of the ever widening gap between the “haves” and the “have-nots” that was noticed by so many writers.

H.G.Wells Time Machine (185) shows a horrific vision of the future if such a social structure were to continue. The upper-classes have evolved into the idle, easily bored and ultimately incapable Eloi, beautiful beings of pleasure that live on the surface of the earth. Meanwhile, due to their working hours and living conditions, the working classes have become the Morlocks, allergic to sunlight due to lack of exposure to it, and staffing massive underground industries for the Eloi’s use. Ultimately the Morlocks have the greater power, tolerating the Eloi only because they are seen similar to cattle in a field, present only as the Morlocks use them as a source of food. Though it is presented as a fantasy world of one writers imagination, the characters listening to the travellers tales often disbelieving themselves, the novel is obviously a call for a change in the system, aiming to shock and disgust the public into the realisation that not only is such a disparity unjust, it is simply detrimental to both sides. It is hard to imagine any contemporary readers would have liked to view themselves as either Eloi or Morlock, and yet when presented in such basic terms to them it seems perfectly possible that this vision could indeed be the future if some reformation did not occur.

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While Time Machine is a good example of a work emphasising the need for change, there are also many contemporary writings that comment on possible solutions to the problem. In Mary Barton while the character’s prospects are only joyous because they are choosing to emigrate, which while being one solution to the poor standard of living that existed for the urban underclass, is one that would be open to very few, Gaskill does pass judgement on the Trade Union movement. Trade unionism was increasing as a force throughout the Victorian era, with many of the working classes seeing strength in numbers as an asset. Chartism, the often violent movement offering an attempt to change working class conditions, was often connected with them. In his essay Chartism written in 18, Thomas Carlyle defines Chartism as “the bitter discontent grown fierce and mad, the wrong condition therefore or the wrong disposition of the Working Class of England”. This could be considered a rather Liberal view of the movement, Thomas Carlyle having great sympathy with the conditions of the working class, where as others of his station simply saw the violence and “Glasgow thuggery”. It is distinct distaste for unionism that is shown by Elizabeth Gaskill, who is otherwise sympathetic to the Working Class plight. The character of John Barton becomes increasingly neglectful of his daughter as his interest in unionism grows after his wife’s death, until he can be adequately described as “a Chartist, ready to do anything for his order”. His union activity is directly proportional to his degeneration as a character, until he is prepared to murder for his cause. Along with her indirect condemnation of Union activity through the degeneration of John’s character, another of Gaskill’s reasons against unionism is put into the mouth of Job Leigh when he says “I were obliged to become a member for peace…they will force me to be wise as they are; now that’s not British liberty”. Whether or not Gaskill’s opinions on unionism are justified could be a matter of historical debate, any chartist would have to contend with far more difficult opposition than simple negativity.

The despite their protests and all the attempts to raise the profile of their plight, Chartists had to contend with gross ignorance. Mr Bounderby in Charles Dickens Hard Times (1854) sees unionists as “as set of rascals and rebels whom transportation is too good for!” and any union activity he exclaims is due to a desire to be fed “turtle soup and venison with a golden spoon”, as the work in the mills is “the pleasantest work there is, and it’s the lightest work there is, and it’s the best paid work there is…we couldn’t improve the mills themselves, unless we laid down Turkey carpets on the floors”. However, the living and working conditions of Stephen Blackpool and Rachael show this to be far from the case. The utilitarian ideals that are embodied by Mr Gradgrind and Mr Bourderby, are proved distinctly lacking by the end of the novel. The dysfunctional lives of all of those brought up through Gradgrind’s school, the distinct contrast between Sissy Jupe and Bitzer being a case in point, shows that the ideology while maybe not terminally flawed, creates heartless and unfeeling individuals, whose necessity for statistics leaves them incomplete. Facts are not all that is needed; sympathy for other human beings is also required.

Chapter II of Thomas Carlyle’s Chartism deals solely with the problems of using only statistics. He uses illustrations such as employment figures leaving uncounted the number of people who no longer have need for jobs as they have died through starvation. While he later claims “He that will not work according to his faculty, let him perish according to his necessity” he believes that the chartists complaints are justified, feeling great sympathy for those he dubs the “Sanspotatoes” (ie. Those without potatoes, or any other staple to eat). He ultimately believes that most of these people work to the best of their ability but are still unable to earn a living. Despite being somewhat idealistic, attributing all the anger and violence of the Chartist movement to a gross feeling of injustice on the part of the working class, whereas it probably springs from the more basic need of starvation, his call for action from the government, condemning the Laissez-Faire attitude and Poor Law regulations as insufficient is commendable for its time, despite how moderate it may seem to the modern reader used to the comforts of the welfare state.

It was indeed the same view of Industrial England that inspired Das Kapital, Karl Marx work that founded the communist ideals. Yet the “two classes…daily becoming more opposed to one another” did not cause a revolution in this country as it did in so many other parts of Europe. The year Mary Barton was written, 1848, saw a wave of revolutions across Italy, Austro-Hungary, France and countless other places, and though the principles behind them were Liberal and Nationalist, they gained mass support because the masses were starving. Britain’s different political system meant they were not subject to such individual causes, but ultimately “mutual interests and mutual respect” between the classes are what saved this country from a mass uprising later on. Though reform was slow in coming, the situation did not reach such a desperate pitch as to make revolution and overhaul necessary. Although ultimately the range of texts covered in this essay is limited to ones that show only sympathy for the working classes, this situation in England was not as bad as it could have been, other European countries suffering much more from the wake of the industrial revolution.



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Saturday, February 2, 2013

Gilbert Grape

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Topic ¡°Gilbert begins and end the film in the same place yet he has traveled far¡± Do you agree?

¡°Gilbert Grape has had to leave his dreams behind because of circumstances. He has a hostility that he can¡¯t express because of his duties and responsibilities to his family. To be able to deal with himself every day, he¡¯s had to make himself numb so that he¡¯s not affected too much by everything.¡± (Johnny Depp)

¡°In the film, Gilbert is, in the words of the director, a ¡°reactor¡± his own impulses and needs have been subjugated so thoroughly that he seems passive, only responding to the calls and demands of others, to the extent that he can only see his life in terms of other people...¡±

Gilbert Grape lives with his family in the town of Endora in Iowa. He works in Lamson¡¯s Grocery, which, like Endora itself, is slowly dying.

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The film opens as Gilbert and Arnie enact their yearly ritual of waiting for the flaming caravans of the Airstream Trailer Club to pass through

In the beginning of the film Gilbert is a quiet person. He is withdrawn and seemed like an outsider in his own family. He doesnt really fit into his surroundings and he seems numb towards himself.

It Becky¡¯s arrival that began the changed that we gradually saw in Gilbert. His attitude towards his duties and responsibilities to his family changed after he hit Arnie. ¡°I hit him so hard ¡­ you don¡¯t hurt Arnie, you just don¡¯t¡­¡± it is only after his beating of Arnie, and his talk with Becky about his father, that we see him change from reacting to acting. He will no longer regard his mother as a joke, so he responds by setting up the house for her funeral.

Over the cause of the film Gilbert undergoes deep change. He is at first embarrassed by his mother, speaks unsympathetically of her and even, at on point, lifts a small child to the window to peek at her. Yet in the final scenes, with Bonnie on her bed, there is love, tenderness and respect between the two.

Emotionally Gilbert has changed enormously. The views which he held towards family and life has changed, the way in which he looks at people has changed, and the way he saw his mother has changed.

Towards the end of the film when Gilbert wants his mother to meet Becky he says ¡°I¡¯m not going to hurt you any more. I promise.¡± At the beginning of the film you would not have heard or expected Gilbert to say something like that, however towards the end he realised that he was being inconsiderate and cruel.

He also confronts his father¡¯s death by going down to the basement. He wasn¡¯t able to do that till 17 years later which showed how much he was affected by it, nevertheless in the end he went down there and faced the truth.

The responsibility of Arnie in the beginning seemed like a bundle on Gilbert and he once said ¡°some days you want him to live and some days you don¡¯t¡± However during the last few scenes he accepted the responsibility of Arnie.

The ending also showed Gilbert and the family working as a ¡®family¡¯ as they moved everything out of the house. As you see the house go up in flames, you can also see traces of the old Gilbert burn away as well.

So in the end he was free. Free to make his own decisions, free to go anywhere, and free of his responsibilities and duties to his mother.



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